Watts, “Against Pride in Clothes” read by Will Orr

Source:UMW  Watts Against Pride in Clothes

 

Why should our garments, made to hide
Our parents' shame, provoke our pride?
The art of dress did ne'er begin
Till Eve our mother learnt to sin.

When first she put the covering on,
Her robe of innocence was gone;
And yet her children vainly boast
In the sad marks of glory lost.

How proud we are! how fond to shew
Our clothes, and call them rich and new,
When the poor sheep and silkworms wore
That very clothing long before!

The tulip and the butterfly
Appear in gayer coats than I:
Let me be dress'd fine as I will,
Flies, worms, and flowers exceed me still.

Then will I set my heart to find
Inward adornings of the mind:
Knowledge and virtue, truth and grace,
These are the robes of richest dress.

No more shall worms with me compare,
This is the raiment angels wear:
The Son of God, when here below,
Put on this blest apparel too.

It never fades, it ne'er grows old,
Nor fears the rain, nor moth, nor mould:
It takes no spot, but still refines;
The more `tis worn, the more it shines.

In this on earth would I appear,
Then go to heaven, and wear it there:
God will approve it in his sight;
'Tis his own work, and his delight.

 

 

 

 

 

Watts, “Against Evil Company” read by Christine LaPlaca

Watts Against Evil Company read by Christine LaPlaca

 

Against Evil Company

 

              Why should I join with those in Play,
                 In whom I’ve no delight,
              Who curse and swear, but never pray,
                  Who call ill Names, and fight.
              I hate to hear a wanton Song,
                  Their Words offend my Ears:
              I should not dare defile my Tongue
                  With Language such as theirs.
              Away from Fools I’ll turn my Eyes,
                Nor with the Scoffers go;
            I would be walking with the Wise,
                That wiser I may grow.
            From one rude Boy that’s us’d to mock
                Ten learn the wicked Jest;
            One sickly Sheep infects the Flock,
                And poysons all the rest.

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Watts, “Man Frail and God Eternal” read by T. Wellington

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Watts, “Crucifixion to the World by the Cross of Christ” read by T. Wellington

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Watts, “A Cradle Hymn” read by T. Wellington

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Watts, “The Day of Judgment” read by T. Wellington

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Watts, “How Doth the Little Busy Bee” read by Kristin Hughes

Source: Librivox.org
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How doth the little busy bee
Improve each shining hour,
And gather honey all the day
From every opening flower.

How skilfully she builds her cell!
How neat she spreads the wax!
And labours hard to store it well
With the sweet food she makes.

In works of labour, or of skill,
I would be busy too;
For Satan finds some mischief still
For idle hands to do.

In books, or work, or healthful play,
Let my first years be past,
That I may give for every day
Some good account at last.

Watts, “Hymn XC” sung by Karen Savage.

Source: Librivox.org Text.
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Watts, “Psalm LXXII” read by Jerome Lawsen

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Watts, “Against Idleness and Mischief” read by Caroline Schumacher

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How doth the little busy Bee
Improve each shining Hour,
And gather Honey all the day
From every opening Flower!

How skilfully she builds her Cell!
How neat she spreads the Wax!
And labours hard to store it well
With the sweet Food she makes.

In Works of Labour or of Skill
I would be busy too:
For Satan finds some Mischief still
For idle Hands to do.

In Books, or Work, or healthful Play
Let my first Years be past,
That I may give for every Day
Some good Account at last.

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